OHS management exam questions

Here are some typical OHS management exam questions, at NQF Levels 4, 5 and 6, based on the proposed vocational Occupational Health and Safety Practitioner curriculum standard.

 

This post includes some exam questions, that may also be set as practical exercises, relevant to some aspects of OHS internal auditing; safe working practices; risk assessment principles; and quality management.

 

OHS auditing questions

 

Q; Explain what is meant by ethics, and why ethical behaviour is important in business?

 

Q; Describe the consequences of unethical behaviour for occupational health and safety?

 

Q; Describe how an occupational health and safety monitoring system relies on ethical behaviour to ensure its effectiveness?

 

Q; Give two scenarios of conduct in a workplace during internal auditing; and indicate ethical and unethical behaviour in the examples; and explain the potential impact of such behaviour on the organisation?

 

Safe working practices questions

 

Q; Identify and explain the main safety practices required for a general workplace?

 

Q; Identify and explain health and safety practices relevant to the machinery, tools and equipment used in a general workplace?

 

Q; Identify and explain specific safety practices required for the range of work activities relevant to a specific work area of your choice?

 

Q; Identify and explain emergency preparedness and response relevant to a work area of your choice?

 

Q; Use various scenarios of safe and unsafe acts and work conditions with different practices being applied, and;

  1. Identify correct safe work practices;
  2. Identify equipment that is unsafe or defective;
  3. Identify relevant emergency preparedness responses?

 

Risk assessment principles

 

Define what is meant by cause and effect, and give examples of how this applies to hazard identification, to risk assessment and to accident/incident investigation. (NQF Level 4)

 

  1. Explain how a cause and effect analysis works and how it applies to risk assessment, hazard identification and incident/accident investigation. (NQF Level 4)

 

  1. Explain what is meant by preventative, corrective and contingency actions;

And give examples of how this is applied in hazard identification, risk assessment and accident/incident investigations;

And include pre-contact, contact and post contact controls. (NQF Level 4)

 

Give descriptions of various accidents and incidents in different industries and work environments and;

  1. Indicate how these situations explain the concept of cause and effect
  2. Describe how a cause and effect analysis should be done in each of the given situations;
  3. Through examples explain each step in a typical cause and effect process.

 

Quality management questions

 

Explain the document and record classification process for Occupational Health and Safety; a. Statutory documentation and records (Long retention period);

  1. Confidential documents and records;
  2. Resources and reference material;
  3. Other media (manuals, DVDs drawings etc.) (NQF Level 4)

 

  1. Describe the principles for record keeping and archiving documents. (NQF Level 4)

 

  1. Describe the principles for backup and retention of critical documents and records.
  2. Retention periods;
  3. Review and updates;
  4. Disposals (NQF Level 4).

 

  1. Explain the principles of document and record security:
  2. Statutory requirements;
  3. Classified documents;
  4. Unclassified documents.
  5. Access control;
  6. Physical security. (NQF Level 4)

 

  1. Describe the criteria for the quality of Occupational Health and Safety documentation. (NQF Level 4)

 

  1. Give a range of Occupational health and Safety media, reports and documents, and;
  2. Classify the documents regarding the need for security and retention;
  3. Identify deficiencies in the document control systems used;
  4. Indicate appropriate actions to improve the controls of the documents and media;
  5. Indicate how to continually optimise the effectiveness of document control.

 

  • Source; Occupational Health and Safety Practitioner curriculum standard draft, under patronage of the MQA Seta, proposed to the QCTO.
  • See extracts from the document, and the call to mining and general industry and labour to comment on the draft, on Sheqafrica.com.
  • The extract above is generic, and partial, and does not represent a particular course or test.
  • The curriculum standard includes many more modules, and similar modules at lower and higher levels, and practical elements, and work experience elements.
  • To formulate answers, see other posts on the various relevant Sheq disciplines on Sheqafrica.com
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Edmond Furter

Editor at Sheqafrica.com
Edmond Furter is the editor of Sheqafrica.com. He is a freelance technical journalist, and has won six journalism awards. He specialises in industrial, business, and cultural content in web, journal, and book formats.

4 thoughts on “OHS management exam questions

  1. I am a little at a loss here. Does the Occupational Health and Safety Practitioner become a librarian (a person who provides access to information and sometimes to social or technical programming)?
    He is now required to “Describe criteria for the quality of Occupational Health and Safety documentation. (NQF Level 4)”.

    The following are also typical duties of a librarian:
    6. Give a range of Occupational health and Safety media, reports and documents, and;
    7. Classify the documents regarding the need for security and retention;
    8. Identify deficiencies in the document control systems used;
    9. Indicate appropriate actions to improve the controls of the documents and media;
    10. Indicate how to continually optimise the effectiveness of document control.

    I have recently done a status quo assessment of various sites where inter alia diesel storage tanks were in use. Each tank had a spillage reservoir directly underneath.
    None of the installations were safe for any form of application of emergency steps especially in the event of a serious incident.

    I don’t see how any of the above items under the various questions may be of any help in preparing any person to deal with such an event or to do a reasonably correct risk assessment beforehand.

    How do I apply the above requirements in cases of non-compliance?
    I am trying to apply this question to many other issues I have encountered during thousands of visits to sites. And I have many more doubts about this scenario.

    I therefor need to ask; What is the purpose of these (exam) questions?
    What is the examiner trying to achieve? How do these requirements find real meaningful and practical application in the field – outside the office where the real problem lies?

  2. I agree totally with what Johan is saying. OHS should be about practical and workable solutions to risks and hazards in the workplace. Mountains of paperwork will not prevent an incident or save a life.

  3. I tend to disagree with you Gentlemen, I have looked at the question of ethical behavior and I find it very relevant as there are contracts that requires the contractor to employ all consultants including the Construction Health and Safety Agent under one contract (Turnkey Contract). Ethics will play a pivotal role in that instance because a consultant is now challenged to do his work without a fear of being fired by the hand that feeds him or her. Those who do not possess ethics will end up agreeing on whatever the contractor says for the fear of being fired in the process the health and safety of employees will be compromised. I think the questions relating to ethics are good and relevant.

    The paper work is good if what is on paper is implemented. What I have noticed is that people tend to have a lot of paper work just to comply with the requirements of the Act. SHAME on those who keep on doing that, we need to unite and make the construction industry a safe workplace that all of us can be proud of. The issue of practical and workable solutions cannot be overemphasized.

    Regards

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