Viral Facts Africa initiative to combat dangerous health misinformation

Brazzaville – Viral Facts Africa, a first of its kind African initiative to combat health misinformation online, was launched today by the World Health Organization (WHO) and a network of fact-checking organizations and leading public health bodies. 

Viral Facts Africa will leverage the insights and reach of a unique network of 14 organizations to counter health misinformation as it spreads and to “inoculate” people against falsehoods. The initiative is starting with engaging health fact checks, explainers, myth busters and misinformation literacy messages that are optimized for sharing on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

“False claims can spread faster than COVID-19 itself, often because they are simple, visual and tap into our emotions. Viral Facts Africa aims to debunk myths fast right where they spread, and to help people sort life-saving facts from noise. Together, we can stop viral rumours by sharing viral facts,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.

Information on COVID-19 was shared and viewed over 16 billion times and mentioned more than 6 million times on Twitter and web-based news sites between November 2020 and March 2021 in the 47 countries of the WHO African Region, according to UN Global Pulse, The UN Secretary-General’s global initiative on big data and artificial intelligence. 

Similarly, in the WHO African Region mentions of vaccines rose by over 300% to over 675 000 between December 2020 and February 2021 when compared with the previous two months. The Viral Facts Africa launch comes as 90 million more COVID-19 vaccines are set to arrive in Africa in the coming months.  

Tracking the focus of misinformation circulating on social media is difficult, but African fact-checking organizations say they have debunked more than 1300 misleading reports since the onset of the pandemic. Widely shared misinformation includes conspiracies around unproven treatments, false cures and antivaccine messages. 

During the testing phase, Viral Facts Africa products were viewed over 20 million times on social media. All products are open for anyone to use and are available in English and French, with more languages planned. The initiative is managed by Fathm, an independent news laboratory and consultancy with global experience of anti-misinformation collaborations.

Viral Facts Africa is a part of the Africa Infodemic Response Alliance (AIRA), a WHO-hosted network that coordinates actions and pools resources to combat misinformation and fill information gaps around the COVID-19 pandemic and other health emergencies in Africa. 

Launched in December 2020 with 12 organizations, AIRA brings together the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent (IFRC), UNICEF, UNESCO, UN Verified, UN Global Pulse, WHO and the fact-checking organizations Africa Check, PesaCheck, Agence France Presse Fact Check, Dubawa and Meedan. The alliance is growing, with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and Ghana Fact also recently joining. 

“COVID-19 is not over, and as vaccines are rolled out across Africa, mask wearing, hand hygiene and physical distancing are still key to saving lives. We need a whole-of-society push to keep these messages fresh in people’s minds and everyone has a role to play as viral health misinformation costs lives,” said Dr Moeti.

Viral Facts Africa was launched at a workshop on health communications for leading African influencers from business, sports, the arts and the media hosted by the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, the African Union, the Rockefeller Foundation, Access Challenge and WHO. 


Sample Viral Facts Africa Content

WHO

New dawn for Botswana’s COVID-19 response

Gaborone, Botswana – 27 March 2021 – A shipment of 24 000 doses of the AstraZeneca South Korea COVID-19 Vaccine, has arrived at the Sir Seretse Khama International Airport in Gaborone. Obtained from SKBioscience in South Korea, it is the first shipment of 100 000 vaccines purchased by the Government of Botswana, enabled through the COVAX Facility.

While receiving the COVAX consignment, Vice President Slumber Tsogwane remarked that the vaccines have been acquired by the Government of Botswana with the intention to vaccinate everyone in the entire population. He furthermore affirmed President Mokgweetsi Masisi’s intention to do all that is necessary to save lives, including foregoing planned development projects.

The shipment is the first of many that will be allocated to Botswana in the coming months through the COVAX Facility. The facility is working to accelerate the development of and access to COVID-19 vaccines. It is co-led by the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the World Health Organization (WHO) working in partnership with UNICEF as well as the World Bank, manufacturers, civil society organizations, and others.

“WHO and the COVAX partners are happy to support the Government of Botswana in combating COVID-19. These vaccines will complement the other public health measures including wearing masks, hand washing, and social distancing. Botswana has done a tremendous job in its efforts to control the disease and roll-out vaccination. We commend their efforts and reaffirm our commitment to support them further,” said Dr. Josephine Namboze, WHO Country Representative in Botswana.

This is the second batch of vaccines that entered the country this month. On 9 March Botswana received a donation of 30 000 COVID-19 vaccines from India. The Covishield vaccines are the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines manufactured locally by the Serum Institute of India, the world’s largest vaccine manufacturer.

In the past year, over 36 000 people had been infected, over 500 lives lost, sluggish growth in the economy, and disruptions to everyday life. The COVAX Facility plans to deliver at least 2 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines by the end of this year. This is an exceptional global effort to make sure citizens worldwide have access to vaccines and that lives may be saved. The arrival of the COVID-19 vaccine and the immediate roll-out of an extensive vaccination plan provides new hope in the continuing fight against the pandemic in Botswana.

WHO

#YesToCovidVaccine: Jigawa records impressive turnout as vaccination effort in Nigeria progresses

Jigawa, 29 March 2021 – On a recent weekday, community health worker Hajiya Balkisu Yahaya bared her arm and felt the small prick of the needle as she got her first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine from a colleague. In return, Hajiya Balkisu vaccinated her colleague too. The two are health workers deployed as vaccination teams to immunise against the COVID-19 disease in Nigeria’s Jigawa State and are some of the first to get the jab. 

“I have taken the first dose and I am now very very happy,” Hajiya Balkisu, who works at the Sakwaya Primary Healthcare Center in Dutse, the capital, said. “It’s good so I can protect myself first before protecting others.”

Only two weeks into the arrival of Covid-19 vaccines in Nigeria, Jigawa state, is recording impressive results as authorities accelerate efforts to distribute doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, millions of which are available across Nigeria. The  vaccines  were delivered to the country from the Serum Institute of India(SII) in early March.

Jigawa has the second-highest turnout for the vaccine, second only to Lagos State. Authorities here received 68,520 doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine and 33,508 persons have been vaccinated by March 29. The state has recorded 518 of the 162,593 COVID-19 cases in Nigeria by the same date. 

Hajiya Balkisu says the turn out signifies some vaccination success despite instances of Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy among some residents. 

Since the start of the pandemic last year, unfounded theories about the origin of COVID-19 as well as rumours about the vaccine’s safety  have spread widely across the internet and social media space in Nigeria. Some of them spread claims of vaccines causing infertility in women while others have claimed that vaccines will be administered to the country’s political elite only. 

But working with local communities, the state has overcome a huge part of the fear, state officials note. Getting Jigawa’s residents to turn out was possible largely due to the influence of traditional and religious leaders, according to Mr Hassan Shaibu Kwallam, the State Immunization Officer.

“Our strategy has been a very simple one. We have the buy-in of the local health workers and we also have the cooperation of the traditional leaders. That has made the vaccination process go smoothly.”

When it was time for His Royal Highness, the Emir of Hadejia to get his first jab on a recent Monday, he did it publicly, opting to take the vaccine at the Hadejia General Hospital in the Hadejia Local Government Area (LGA) where many in his community could see. After the Emir received the injection, he held up his green vaccine card,with a QR code stamped on it, for proof.

“I hope to dispel the rumours that a different vaccine, safer and more potent, is being administered to only very important personalities,” the Emir said. “Coming out like this will build trust and confidence in the minds of many that harbour this misconception and will lead to a higher turn-out for vaccine rollout. I am sure of it.”

Partnerships work
It’s not the first time Jigawa has successfully immunized thousands despite some pockets of hesitancy, health authorities say. When the Polio disease was endemic in Nigeria and parents were reluctant to get their wards vaccinated, health workers also turned to traditional and religious leaders for advocacy support. This culminated in the huge success recorded in 2020 when Nigeria was declared polio-free after years of fighting the disease.

Alhaji Ahmed Mohammed Sani, Emir of Gumel who received his vaccine last Wednesday says partnerships between local leaders and health workers increase chances of success when it comes to immunisation.

 “I am presenting my humble self for the COVID-19 vaccination before all so everybody can do the same,” the Emir said. “What we, as an emirate had successfully done during the polio eradication initiative, is a clear testimony of our sustained ability to convince our communities in support of any public health interventions brought up by the government.”

Only health workers like Hajiya Balkisu and traditional leaders were targeted for the first phase of the roll-out, to protect health personnel and build trust among communities. Now, phase two (which targets adults aged 50 and older) and then phase three (for ages between 18 and 49) are due to have commenced. Those who successfully receive their first jabs are expected to take their second doses after 12 weeks.

Nigeria received  3.9 million vaccines in March out of an expected 84 million doses through the COVAX Facility, co-led by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, WHO and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations(CEPI), in partnership with the United Nations Children’s Fund, the World Bank, and other partners. COVAX is one pillar of the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator, a global collaboration to hasten production and fair access to COVID-19 tests, treatments and vaccines. 

An additional 41.3 million vaccine doses through the Africa vaccine acquisition task team(AVATT) and the African Union are expected in April.

No need for fear
Back in Jigawa, Hajiya Balkisu said she has had to convince many that the slight fever some feel after taking the vaccine was normal – she felt it too and it went away in a day, she added.

Dr Sunday Audu, WHO Jigawa state coordinator echoed her message. “There is no reason for hesitancy,” he urged. “There have been no reports of any serious Adverse Effect Following Immunization (AEFI) in the state. It is only a minor inconvenience but it would be beneficial for more people to get their doses so we can protect ourselves and our neighbours.”

WHO has supported in training the 162 vaccination teams deployed across the 27 LGAs of Jigawa, including Hajiya Balkisu’s team. WHO technical officers, Dr Audu promised, will continue supporting the coordination, training, monitoring and supervision of health care workers till all doses are used up.

“I will advise my colleagues and everyone else to put their mind at rest,” Hajiya Balkisu added as she attended to people waiting to be vaccinated. “Don’t think too much about the inconvenience of the jab. Just relax and you will be fine. It’s much less painful than contracting Covid-19 and falling sick.”

Technical Contacts:

Dr Audu Sunday; Email: audusu [at] who.int; Tel: +234 8035664472

Dr Jean Baptiste, Anne Eudes. Email: jeana [at] who.int; Tel: +234 8131736281

WHO

Update COVID-19 30 March 2021

30 March 2021 — One hundred and fifty-five (155) new COVID-19 cases were identified out of 7792 samples tested today. This brings the cumulative number of confirmed cases twenty-one thousand, six hundred, and forty-five (21645). To date, twenty thousand and one (20001) patients have recovered, including one hundred and forty-one (141) in the past 24 hours. The number of active cases is one thousand, three hundred, and thirty-eight (1338) and three hundred and six (306) deaths. 

The new cases are in Gisagara (27), Huye (26), Kigali City (19), Rwamagana (16), Rutsiro (16), Gicumbi (8), Nyamagabe (7), Nyaruguru (6), Burera (5), Rubavu (3), Nyagatare (3), Gakenke (3), Ruhango (3), Nyanza (2), Kayonza (2), Karongi (2), Bugesera (2), Ngororero (2), Rulindo (1), Musanze (1), and Muhanga (1); heightened vigilance is required everywhere.

The COVID-19 prevention measures announced by the Government of Rwanda must continue to be rigorously observed, especially frequent hand-washing and physical distancing. In addition, face masks must be worn in public and multi-family compounds.
Withholding information related to contact tracing or COVID-19 symptoms, jeopardises public safety and will be punished in accordance with applicable laws. 

The key symptoms of coronavirus are dry cough, shortness of breath, and fever. Automated screening is available by dialing *114#. Symptoms can also be reported to a medical professional, or as follows:  
Phone: 114 (toll-free);  
Whatsapp message to:  +250788202080; 
E mail: callcenter [at] rbc.gov.rw.    

Let’s continue to work together to defeat this pandemic. 

For more information: 

Click on Rwanda Biomedical Centre Website: https://www.rbc.gov.rw  

Click on WHO African Region COVID-19 Dashboard: https://arcg.is/XvuSX
Click on WHO website to view the Corona Virus Situation Dashboard with updated number of cases globally and country by country https://covid19.who.int/  

 

WHO

International Women’s Day 2021

March 8 holds a special place in every woman’s heart. It’s a day of celebration for acknowledgement of women’s contribution to human development. Women in the past were house makers, but today women play a major role in cultural, economic, political, and social affairs. Women are the majority in the world population and their contribution is a matter of great importance.  

This year, the theme for International Women’s Day held on (8th March), was “Women in leadership: Achieving an equal future in a COVID-19 world”.

We at WHO Eritrea realize the importance of March 8 and as such, we celebrated it in the office. Men in the office served the ladies; honouring the special day with Traditional Coffee Ceremony. Every lady in the office was presented with a flower and a postcard wishing women a pleasant day and appreciating women’s contribution.
 
The WR and male work colleagues took turns in making speeches and stated that women are the backbone of the family and workplace. They play a decisive role in the success of organizations, including WHO. Our male staff members mutually and conjointly pledged to support women and make the workplace better for women. They also pledged to help women achieve upper career mobility and make them high earners, happy mothers’ and strong family members. 

Women’s day March 8 shall live in our heart and will be celebrated daily. At the end of the eventful celebration, the men participants congratulated the women and affirmed that they will celebrate next year’s March 8 Women’s day within a COVID free environment, closer proximity and much more fanfare. 

May the future hold better things for the future of women in Eritrea! 

WHO

My vaccination experiences-recipients speak after receiving COVID-19 vaccine 

Abuja, 31 March 2021 – “Nine days after receiving the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, I am yet to experience any negative side effect and I was among the first set of health workers in Nigeria who received the vaccine. The vaccine is safe as I have not felt any different or ill”, says Mary Yarda, a Nursing officer at the National Hospital, Abuja. 

For Nurse Yarda, receiving the vaccine is mind-settling working in an environment that makes health workers susceptible to contracting the virus. 

On 05 March 2021, Nigeria kick-started the vaccination drive for frontline health workers at the National Hospital Abuja, with the doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by the Serum Institutes of India from Mumbai shipped into the country on 02 March, 2021 via the COVAX Facility, a partnership between CEPI, Gavi, UNICEF and World Health Organisation (WHO). 

“I had no doubt about receiving the vaccine. In fact, I was looking forward to when the vaccine was going to get to the country, and the government would start administering it. The only experience I had after taking the vaccine was the heaviness of the hand, but that is common with most vaccines. The scary part of the pandemic before taking the vaccine was going home and potentially exposing my family to the virus.  

“Anytime I close from work, I always went home with prayers of not exposing my family to the virus. I live in a fenced apartment, so I pull my clothes and shoes outside and head straight for the bathroom before having any interaction with my family. It was not easy, but I knew it was something I had to do to protect them, so this [the vaccine rollout] is very exciting, she said.

More endorsements by recipients 
Nigeria was allocated 3.94 million doses of Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine from COVAX facility to cover health workers and other vulnerable groups with more arrivals expected in the coming weeks as part of an unprecedented effort to deliver at least 2 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines worldwide by the end of 2021.
Nigeria has since deployed the vaccine and, initiated vaccination across the country. 

For Chioma Sandra Nwoga, nursing officer II with the National Hospital Abuja, receiving the vaccine was not much of a tough decision. Although she was not part of the first people who took the vaccine, she decided to take the jab because the COVID-19 pandemic had not only affected her social life and interaction with her family and colleagues. Also, she has seen people infected and died of the virus. 

“The jab was not as painful as I thought it would be. However, immediately after I took the vaccine, I started sweating, had some numbness as if I had just finished an exercise and heaviness in the arm where I took the vaccine. I also had a slight headache. Aside from that, I have been fine. All these reactions are common when you take other vaccines too. If taking the vaccine means I can get home and not be scared of hugging my two years old son, then I knew I had to take it. My neighbours have stopped coming to my home or playing with my children because I am a nurse. They are scared of contracting the disease through them. I did this for them, she said.

Also, Audu Caroline, the Chief Nursing Officer in charge of the Staff Clinic, Family Medicine, National Hospital, Abuja, appreciated the government for administering the vaccine to frontline health workers across the country, saying it would stem the level of infections among the workforce. 

Nurse Audu had received the vaccine alongside the first set of health workers in Abuja. 

“I only had pain in my hands the second day and after taking a pain killer, I got better. There are lots of misinformation about the vaccine, even among health workers, but I can tell you it is not true because I have taken the vaccine. The vaccine is safe. I have been advising my colleagues to summon the courage and take the vaccine and not to stop observing the precautionary measures despite taking the vaccine”, she said.

Hope in the horizon

However, being vaccinated does not mean that people can throw caution to the wind and put themselves and others at risk. 

 To buttress this point, Dr Walter Kazadi Mulombo, the WHO Nigeria Country Representative (WR), said “vaccine is a powerful tool, but it is an additional tool. Nigerians need to continue adhering to other public health and social measures. People need to continue to wear face masks in public, avoid confined places, continue to wash their hands or use hand sanitizers, maintain physical distancing and other measures”.

COVAX is co-led by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), working in partnership with UNICEF, the World Bank, civil society organizations, manufacturers, and others. 

COVAX is part of the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator, a ground-breaking global collaboration to accelerate development, production, and equitable access to COVID-19 tests, treatments, and vaccines. 

Technical Contacts:

Dr JEAN BAPTISTE, Anne Eudes. Email: jeana [at] who.int; Tel: +234 813 173 6281

WHO

s189 Video Consultations – Labour Law In A Nutshell March 2021

 

s189 Video Consultations: Is it legally acceptable to conduct s189 retrenchment consultations by video conferencing?

 

Yes – said the Labour Court in Food and Allied Workers Union (FAWU) v South African Breweries.

SAB had started a restructuring process in January 2020. They opted for CCMA facilitation due to the large number of employees who were potentially affected. The parties agreed to a facilitation timetable of in-person meetings with the facilitator. Soon after the process started, the President announced the Level 5 national lock-down. This made the in-person meetings impossible.

The parties were left with only two options: to postpone the consultations until the lockdown was lifted or to conduct the rest of the consultation meetings by video conferencing. The facilitator proposed video conferencing. The union rejected the proposal so strongly that the facilitator recused himself and another one had to be appointed.

When the union flatly refused to participate in the video consultations on Zoom, the company proceeded in its absence. They began to populate the new structure and issued notices of termination to affected employees.

The union brought an urgent application to the Labour Court to stop the consultations being conducted on the video platform. They complained that it was procedurally unfair to conduct the consultations online by video instead of in-person with the union officials. This was because the technology was inefficient and unreliable and that it could not replace physical consultation.

The Labour Court had to decide if it was appropriate for parties to conduct s189 retrenchment consultations by video conferencing during the lockdown period. In deciding that it is an appropriate and fair means to conduct the consultations. It made several observations –

  • Section 189 of the LRA does not prescribe the form that consultation must take. In fact, section 189(6)(b) suggests that the process could be conducted by correspondence.
  • Parties have to adapt to the new circumstances and embrace the use of technology to deal with health and safety concerns in the time of COVID-19.
  • They need to accept that this is sure to be the new normal for some time.
  • Teething problems with connectivity and other issues were to be expected and should not be used as a reason to reject the use of the technology.

(J435/20) [2020] ZALCJHB 92; (2020) 41 ILJ 2652 (LC) (28 May 2020)

Source: Article in Labour Law Guide by Jose Jorge, Director and Chanté du Plessis, Candidate Attorney, Employment, Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr
Edited by Sarah Christie

  • Video conferencing is a necessary tool to assist parties to comply with Covid restrictions like social distancing as a measure to avoid the spread of the virus.
  • Video conferencing has become the “new normal” method of conducting consultations and other legal processes during the lockdown. It offers a meaningful way for parties to conduct consultations as envisaged by s189.
  • The union’s insistence on physical consultations was self-serving and ignorant of the bigger issue of health and safety.
  • The union had unreasonably refused to participate in the process on the Zoom video facility. It was not the company’s fault that the union chose to abandon the process.
  • The company was entitled to proceed with the restructuring process on the video conferencing platform to completion without the union’s participation.

TIP:        The courts have accepted that the use of video conferencing to conduct legal processes such as s189 retrenchment consultations has become the “new normal”. This implies that the use of online communication video and other technology will long outlive Covid restrictions. In the short term, it’ll help to protect us from health risks during the pandemic. In the long-term, its value in drastically cutting down the costs of travel and time will continue to expand its use as the go-to method of conducting workplace and social engagements. There’ll have to be an exceptional reason to justify a refusal to embrace the new normal.

PATRICK DEALE

labour lawyer & mediator

ONLINE LEGAL SERVICES:

I’m available to discuss your legal issues online by Zoom or other video conferencing.

You’re welcome to call or email me to set up a time which suits you.

CELL:      083 375 8771

EMAIL:   patrick@deale.co.za

WEB:      www.deale.co.za

Update COVID-19 29 March 2021

29 March 2021 — Seventy-one (71) new COVID-19 cases were identified out of 7044 samples tested today. This brings the cumulative number of confirmed cases twenty-one thousand, four hundred, and ninety (21490). To date, nineteen thousand, eight hundred, and sixty (19860) patients have recovered, including fifty-five (75) in the past 24 hours. The number of active cases is one thousand, three hundred, and twenty-five (1325) and three hundred and five (305) deaths. 

The new cases are in Kigali City (20), Gisagara (16), Muhanga (8), Huye (8)  Rubavu (4), Nyamagabe (4), Nyanza (3), Nyaruguru (2), Kayonza (2), Gicumbi (2), Kirehe (1), and Gakenke (1); heightened vigilance is required everywhere.

The COVID-19 prevention measures announced by the Government of Rwanda must continue to be rigorously observed, especially frequent hand-washing and physical distancing. In addition, face masks must be worn in public and multi-family compounds.
Withholding information related to contact tracing or COVID-19 symptoms, jeopardises public safety and will be punished in accordance with applicable laws. 

The key symptoms of coronavirus are dry cough, shortness of breath, and fever. Automated screening is available by dialing *114#. Symptoms can also be reported to a medical professional, or as follows:  
Phone: 114 (toll-free);  
Whatsapp message to:  +250788202080; 
E mail: callcenter [at] rbc.gov.rw.    

Let’s continue to work together to defeat this pandemic. 

For more information: 

Click on Rwanda Biomedical Centre Website: https://www.rbc.gov.rw  

Click on WHO African Region COVID-19 Dashboard: https://arcg.is/XvuSX
Click on WHO website to view the Corona Virus Situation Dashboard with updated number of cases globally and country by country https://covid19.who.int/  

 

WHO

Update COVID-19 28 March 2021

28 March 2021 — Forty-nine (49) new COVID-19 cases were identified out of 10578 samples tested today. This brings the cumulative number of confirmed cases twenty-one thousand, four hundred, and nineteen (21419). To date, nineteen thousand, seven hundred, and eighty-five (19785) patients have recovered, including forty-four (44) in the past 24 hours. The number of active cases is one thousand, three hundred, and thirty-three (1333) and three hundred and one (301) deaths. 

The new cases are in Nyamagabe (11), Nyanza (9), Rwamagana (7), Bugesera (5), Kigali City (4), Ngoma (4), Muhanga (7), Rubavu (2), Gisagara (1), Ngororero (1), Nyaruguru (1), Kayonza (1), and Huye (1); heightened vigilance is required everywhere.

The COVID-19 prevention measures announced by the Government of Rwanda must continue to be rigorously observed, especially frequent hand-washing and physical distancing. In addition, face masks must be worn in public and multi-family compounds.
Withholding information related to contact tracing or COVID-19 symptoms, jeopardises public safety and will be punished in accordance with applicable laws. 

The key symptoms of coronavirus are dry cough, shortness of breath, and fever. Automated screening is available by dialing *114#. Symptoms can also be reported to a medical professional, or as follows:  
Phone: 114 (toll-free);  
Whatsapp message to:  +250788202080; 
E mail: callcenter [at] rbc.gov.rw.    

Let’s continue to work together to defeat this pandemic. 

For more information: 

Click on Rwanda Biomedical Centre Website: https://www.rbc.gov.rw  

Click on WHO African Region COVID-19 Dashboard: https://arcg.is/XvuSX
Click on WHO website to view the Corona Virus Situation Dashboard with updated number of cases globally and country by country https://covid19.who.int/  

WHO

Update COVID-19 27 March 2021

27 March 2021 — Sixtyty-one (61) new COVID-19 cases were identified out of 4416 samples tested today. This brings the cumulative number of confirmed cases twenty-one thousand, three hundred, and seventy (21370). To date, nineteen thousand, seven hundred, and forty-one (19741) patients have recovered, including eighty-four (84) in the past 24 hours. The number of active cases is one thousand, three hundred, and twenty-eight (1328) and three hundred and one (301) deaths. 

The new cases are in Gicumbi (13), Gisagara (11), Muhanga (7), Bugesera (7), Nyamagabe (96, Kigali City (4), Ngororero (3), Nyaruguru (2), Ruhango (2), Nyanza (2), Burera (1), Rulindo (1), Huye (1), and Rubavu (1); heightened vigilance is required everywhere.

The COVID-19 prevention measures announced by the Government of Rwanda must continue to be rigorously observed, especially frequent hand-washing and physical distancing. In addition, face masks must be worn in public and multi-family compounds.
Withholding information related to contact tracing or COVID-19 symptoms, jeopardises public safety and will be punished in accordance with applicable laws. 

The key symptoms of coronavirus are dry cough, shortness of breath, and fever. Automated screening is available by dialing *114#. Symptoms can also be reported to a medical professional, or as follows:  
Phone: 114 (toll-free);  
Whatsapp message to:  +250788202080; 
E mail: callcenter [at] rbc.gov.rw.    

Let’s continue to work together to defeat this pandemic. 

For more information: 

Click on Rwanda Biomedical Centre Website: https://www.rbc.gov.rw  

Click on WHO African Region COVID-19 Dashboard: https://arcg.is/XvuSX
Click on WHO website to view the Corona Virus Situation Dashboard with updated number of cases globally and country by country https://covid19.who.int/  

 

WHO